Published 28 May by Cryptodiffer Team

Ian:

Sparkster came to our event in both London and Amsterdam, unfortunately they didn't get a chance to pitch in London, but they flew all the way from London to Amsterdam and had a chance to pitch, ended up winning, the audience chose them as a favorite, I ended up doing me and my team ended up doing more homework on the project and after two demos our team came to the conclusion that we want to be a partner, right, so full disclosure I have invested, now with that being said, this is not a paid endorsement, it's not a pay-per-view or paid AMA.


Ian:

Tell us about yourself who are you and what is Sparkster?

Sajjad:

My name is Sajjad Daya, I'm the CEO of Sparkster. Sparkster is the realization of a dream that I've had for many years, it began from a pain point that I once experienced. About 15 years ago, I began my entrepreneurial career and I've been involved in founding and co-founding several businesses. I've been responsible for building the software that runs those businesses and one of my greatest pains was working with software developers and the reason is: in the business world right we'd have a problem, we describe that problem to technical people but the technical people would walk away understanding something different. When they build something it comes back being remarkably different. And, then you spend months kind of going back and forth, you know going from what they built to what you actually need to solve the business's problems and so one day I got frustrated and I said, look, just give me the damn tools so I can do this myself.

The tools didn't exist, so we built them: it's Sparkster and we hope that these tools enable people to be able to bring their ideas to reality and that they're no longer be limited and constrained by not being software developers. Today the platform is able to facilitate people to be able to build applications that integrate with blockchains such as IOTA and Ethereum. We're here to talk about the Sparkster decentralized cloud and how we can facilitate and enable people to build blockchain software in plain English, with no code.


Ian:

The first thing that kind of comes to mind: this is something somebody would just create a very simple app with and nothing complex. Nobody would create the next Uber or Facebook with this, somebody's just gonna make a simple calculator app with it. What's your response to that?

Sajjad:

I disagree. I think this is the future of software development, I think this is the way that everybody's gonna be building software, the evidence of that is that for example Microsoft, Salesforce and a bunch of other companies have entered the low code space. We do think that you can build the next Uber with our platform, it's not traditional WYSIWYG (What You See Is What You Get) experience like Wix or whatever where you're building a website that's just an interface. The key innovation here is: it's an interface plus logic. That logic is in blocks that are in plain English and we have an entire language that's Turing complete and that means that you can create anything you can imagine. One of our advisers, he's a professor at UCF, he went to MIT, he's an expert in computer programming languages and he's assisted us in composing this language to really ensure that you can build anything you can imagine. What developers can do is: they can create actual blocks and write the code behind those blocks so that they can extend the capabilities and features of the Sparkster platform, so this is an ever-growing, ever-evolving sort of platform.

AMA DEMO:

YouTube Timestamp Link


Ian:

Who do you view as your competition?

Sajjad:

That's a good point, in terms of enabling people who cannot code to be able to build software, I don't think that there is any real competition today. There's nobody that owns the market. I don't see Wix as a competitor, in fact, I think that we can take the people that are using Wix and we can make them super users, instead of just building websites you can do a full-blown software.

Sajjad:

Let's move on to testing the TPS of the network because we make a claim that today we had six and half thousand TPS. That's what we want to prove today:

YouTube Timestamp Link

Sajjad:

We have one of those cells, right, at a thousand TPS, here's the key we're going to begin loading the second cell right and as we begin loading the second cell, what you'll see is that there's no decline in the TPS of the first cell. The reason you won't see any to climb on the number of the TPS from one cell to another cell is because they do not share a distributed hash table, they are completely isolated and separated blockchains, right, and so the implications are that you know we can add as many cells as necessary, right, and we can, in fact, achieve 10 million TPS.


Ian:

Can we go back to the DApp, show how to deploy that onto the blockchain?

Sajjad:

What we showed you there was a specific demo that we built that works with the blockchain we're not in a place yet where that works you know inside the platform fully.


Ian:

Are you launching test net in a month?

Sajjad:

Yes.

Sajjad:

I can show you the Ethereum smart contract built in plain English right and, again, the smart contract becomes a block that you can integrate with anything you like.

YouTube Timestamp Link


Ian:

Sparkster says they will create a lot of blockchains that will work in parallel to achieve huge TPS, how will they make sure it's secure blockchain if they're only really to ten participants?

Sajjad:

The first thing is right that the consensus protocol that we've implemented is Stelar consensus protocol and it requires 51% majority so if there are only three participants, you need a majority of at least two to arrive at the consensus on the transaction before that particular blockchain of that particular cell accepts that transaction.

There are no incentives that lie in you know 51% attack on a network, there is no money on those networks, there are no wallets on those networks, there's nothing to steal, there's just customer data, remember these are software transactions.

What do we need to protect against someone saying that they did something without actually doing it. Our network consists of three types of nodes: there are compute nodes, there are storage nodes, and then there are verification nodes, they're the ones that benefit when they catch someone saying that they open the door lock but didn't actually open the door lock.


Ian:

Who is your target client, serious companies will not use click to go software unless this process workflow system, big companies want to cut it themselves to have full control of it.

Sajjad:

Some of the biggest companies: IBM, Microsoft, and Salesforce are all participants in the low code space. We already have interests in our platform from Cisco, Huawei, Nestle, we already have a partnership today with ARM with Nobelium.

But to talk about Nestle specifically, we we've met with the head of innovations at Nestle and you know his fundamental problem was that they're in charge of innovating which means they need to come up with stuff quickly, test it in the market and if it works they put more resources behind it. They were looking to use our platform to solve that particular problem that it takes too long to get stuff built with the traditional software platform. At least from the large companies that we've spoken with, there's a lot of interest in using Sparkster platform.


Ian:

Sparkster has recently switched from Stellar to ERC 20. It looks like a major architecture change, will main network be is Stellar or ERC 20.

Sajjad:

The main net will not be in ERC 20, that will likely be something akin to Stellar tokens.


Ian:

What was the highest bonus given out?

Sajjad:

30%.


Ian:

Why do you promote 10 million TPS when all you're running is a DApp?

Sajjad:

Think about the problem at hand, the world wants to adopt blockchain technology. They need a blockchain that can support millions and millions of customers, millions of millions of transactions, such a blockchain doesn't exist, specifically for software. Now we're not talking about payments. Let's take the example of Amazon: if you add ten products to your cart on Amazon, you've got ten transactions that may only be one payment at the end of the day, but it's ten transactions to add those products to you're cart, that's why we think that there's a necessity

for a decentralized cloud with extremely high levels of TPS, right, because software transactions are significantly more than payment transactions and if we are going to have the world adopt blockchain technology with you know they're moving away from AWS, moving away from Microsoft Azure to a blockchain based decentralized cloud, well, we need a blockchain that has the TPS and ability to scale to support it.


Ian:

You're building a centralized solution, it's not a blockchain with three participants?

Sajjad:

There's nothing centralized about it, so there are the cells that you look at, that's a decentralized blockchain, those would be running on people's desktop computers at home, there would be nodes within the cells that would store that data.


Ian:

Do you plan to do some kind of exercise publicly?

Sajjad:

We'd like to get the community's participation because you saw that what we're doing is with running these transaction generators that are firing the transactions at the network. What we'd like to do is we'd like to get the community's participation to sign up for our public network test and what that will mean is that it won't be us generating those transactions, you guys will be running that software and firing transactions at the network and then you'll be looking at your own dashboard and looking at the TPS of the cell that you're firing at.


Ian:

Your roadmap says you up since 2014? But your website and telegram is only 6 months old, how can you explain it?

Sajjad:

We have rebranded it, so we used to be called symphony.io we rebranded at the beginning of this year to Sparkster because we thought that the name was more encompassing about vision in our mission.


Ian:

How do you want to achieve 10 million TPS and when?

Sajjad:

What we showed today is that one cell can have a thousand TPS and if you add two cells that are two thousand TPS without any degradation in performance of the first cell.

What this means is that we are today in the place where we can achieve millions of TPS if the network participants are there, if there are enough people competing their devices, right, to be able to form sufficient cells, we can get to 10 million TPS. It's not dependent on us, it is dependent on the participation of the community. When they make their devices available, right, we can get there simply because we've got one cell that gets to a thousand TPS, 2 cells of two thousand TPS and so on.


Ian:

Do you provide any benefit for early supporters of Sparkster during a crowdsale? how will you manage crowdsale? Is it going to be either a lottery or gas Wars?

Sajjad:

No, neither no lottery, nor gas wars.

What we thought of as the fairest way to solve this particular problem: we're actually going to do is Proof of Love, where for basically showing your commitment, maybe by participating in the decentralized cloud test, maybe by writing an article, whatever that might be, people with the highest number of points will be awarded access to the crowd sale.


Ian:

Is there mining in Sparkster or is it pre-mined?

Sajjad:

When you contribute your device, when you make your desktop, your mobile phone whatever it is available to the platform, you get paid in Sparkster tokens for making your device available to the network for people to be able to execute and run software, store data on your computer so there's mining from that perspective.

Let me clarify the compute nodes (mobile phones) the storage nodes ( desktop computers) they're both proof of stake but the verification nodes they're a useful proof of work. They're finding the cheaters, right, they're the ones that are asking the door are you unlocked they're the one that's you know checking: did we save this data, do you still have this data, if you don't have the data that's when your stake gets captured and is given to the verification node as a bounty for finding a cheater.


Ian:

Since this is only for non-developers why non-developer users would use your product for what?

Sajjad:

This is not just for non-developers, in fact, some of our biggest supporters are actual developers.

When we were at Mobile World Congress earlier this year exhibiting, I got to meet a bunch of developers there, and what they told me was that one of their core problems is that some VP comes down on a Friday afternoon and tells them: hey, I need you to get this done for me before you go home. Now that might mean that they lose their Friday night, they can spend six to eight hours building whatever it is that they need to build for that VP. With our tool they can get that done in thirty minutes rather than for ten hours. Also it makes software development accessible to non-developers, you now no longer have to be a developer to build software.


Ian:

What's the purpose of the token?

Sajjad:

Other than you know being used as a reward for people contributing their devices, it like I said is proof of stake, and it's integral to how we make sure that the network is safe, right, just like I said instruct the door lock to unlock, how do you know that it actually did unlock, well the verification node has an incentive to be there to verify that the door lock did unlock and if they find someone they didn't, they are getting a big bonus, they're getting that`s entire stake of that individual, so those are the two utilities of the token. It's integral to the operation of the network.

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